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Rome 1600 : the city and the visual arts under Clement VIII / Clare Robertson.

By: Robertson, Clare [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, 2016Description: xi, 449 pages : col. ill., plans, facs. ; 29 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780300215298 (hardback).Subject(s): Clement VIII, Pope, 1536-1605 -- Art patronage | Art, Italian -- Italy -- Rome -- History -- 16th century | Art, Italian -- Italy -- Rome -- History -- 17th century | Architecture -- Italy -- Rome -- History -- 16th century | Architecture -- Italy -- Rome -- History -- 17th century | Rome (Italy) -- Buildings, structures, etc
Contents:
Clement VIII and Aldobrandini Patronage -- The Cardinal Nephew : Pietro Aldobrandini -- Palaces, Villas and Gardens -- Churches and Chapels -- Lives of the Artists -- Appendix 1. Pietro Aldobrandini's Collection of Copied Paintings and Antique Sculpture in 1603 -- Appendix 2. The Palaces of Rome during the Reign of Clement VIII, with an Index -- Appendix 3. The Household of Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini, January 1610.
Summary: "Rome in 1600 was the centre of the artistic world. This book examines the art and architecture of the city around that date, at a time when major innovations especially in painting, were being made, largely due to the presence of Annibale Carracci and Caravaggio. 1600 was a Jubilee year, which offered numerous opportunities for artistic patronage, whether in major projects such as St Peter's, or in lesser schemes such as the restoration of older churches, as part of an growing interest in the early church. New religious orders, such as the Jesuits and Oratorians, also required new forms of decoration for their recently built churches. The book considers the patronage of the pope and his nephew, Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini, as well as major families including the Giustiniani, Mattei and Farnese. Rome was a magnet for artists and architect from all over Europe, who came to study the remains of antiquity and the works of Michelangelo, Raphael and Bramante. The sheer variety of artists working in the city, who came from other parts of Italy, as well as northern Europe, ensured a wide variety of styles, and at times innovative cross-influences. The numerous patrons of the city were spoiled for choice. The book draws on a wide range of contemporary sources and images to reconstruct a snapshot of Rome at this significant time"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: AD New Acquisitions 2017
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Notes Date due
Printed Books Accademia di Danimarca
TORo3.1 Robe 01 (Browse shelf) 1 Available
Printed Books British School at Rome
622.1.R.4 (Browse shelf) 1 Available presented by Clare Robertson

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Clement VIII and Aldobrandini Patronage -- The Cardinal Nephew : Pietro Aldobrandini -- Palaces, Villas and Gardens -- Churches and Chapels -- Lives of the Artists -- Appendix 1. Pietro Aldobrandini's Collection of Copied Paintings and Antique Sculpture in 1603 -- Appendix 2. The Palaces of Rome during the Reign of Clement VIII, with an Index -- Appendix 3. The Household of Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini, January 1610.

"Rome in 1600 was the centre of the artistic world. This book examines the art and architecture of the city around that date, at a time when major innovations especially in painting, were being made, largely due to the presence of Annibale Carracci and Caravaggio. 1600 was a Jubilee year, which offered numerous opportunities for artistic patronage, whether in major projects such as St Peter's, or in lesser schemes such as the restoration of older churches, as part of an growing interest in the early church. New religious orders, such as the Jesuits and Oratorians, also required new forms of decoration for their recently built churches. The book considers the patronage of the pope and his nephew, Cardinal Pietro Aldobrandini, as well as major families including the Giustiniani, Mattei and Farnese. Rome was a magnet for artists and architect from all over Europe, who came to study the remains of antiquity and the works of Michelangelo, Raphael and Bramante. The sheer variety of artists working in the city, who came from other parts of Italy, as well as northern Europe, ensured a wide variety of styles, and at times innovative cross-influences. The numerous patrons of the city were spoiled for choice. The book draws on a wide range of contemporary sources and images to reconstruct a snapshot of Rome at this significant time"-- Provided by publisher.

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