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Oratory and political career in the late Roman republic / Henriette van der Blom, University of Birmingham.

By: Blom, Henriette van der.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2016Description: xii, 377 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781107051935 (hardback).Subject(s): Political oratory -- Rome | Rome -- Politics and government
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. The Role of Oratory in Roman Politics: 1. Oratorical settings and career possibilities; 2. Other routes to political success; Part II. Themes and Oratorical Careers: 3. Tribunician oratory and family inheritance: Gaius Gracchus' political career; 4. Politics behind the scenes: Pompeius' oratory and political career; 5. The oratorical springboard: Caesar's political career; 6. The oratory and career of Piso Caesoninus; 7. Powerful profiling: Cato the Younger and the impact of self-presentation; 8. Career-making in a time of crisis: Marcus Antonius' oratory; Conclusion: towards a new Brutus; Appendix 1. Gaius Gracchus' public speeches; Appendix 2. Pompius' public speeches; Appendix 3. Caesar's public speeches; Appendix 4. Piso's public speeches; Appendix 5. Cato's public speeches.
Summary: "Oratory and Political Career in the Late Roman Republic is a pioneering investigation into political life in the late Roman Republic. It explores the nature and extent to which Roman politicians embraced oratorical performances as part of their political career and how such performances influenced the careers of individual orators such as Gaius Gracchus, Pompeius Magnus, and Julius Caesar. Through six case studies, this book presents a complex and multifaceted picture of how Roman politicians employed oratory to articulate their personal and political agendas, to present themselves to a public obsessed with individual achievement, and ultimately to promote their individual careers. By dealing specifically with orators other than Cicero, this study offers much-needed alternatives to our understanding of public oratory in Rome. Moreover, the assessment of the impact of public speeches on the development of political careers provides new perspectives on the hotly debated nature of republican political culture"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: AD New acquisitions 2020
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Notes Date due
Printed Books Accademia di Danimarca
Ant./rom./rep. Blom (Browse shelf) 1 Available
Printed Books British School at Rome
245.3.B.29 (Browse shelf) 1 Available presented by Henriette Van Der Blom

Includes bibliographical references (p. 328-362) and index.

Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. The Role of Oratory in Roman Politics: 1. Oratorical settings and career possibilities; 2. Other routes to political success; Part II. Themes and Oratorical Careers: 3. Tribunician oratory and family inheritance: Gaius Gracchus' political career; 4. Politics behind the scenes: Pompeius' oratory and political career; 5. The oratorical springboard: Caesar's political career; 6. The oratory and career of Piso Caesoninus; 7. Powerful profiling: Cato the Younger and the impact of self-presentation; 8. Career-making in a time of crisis: Marcus Antonius' oratory; Conclusion: towards a new Brutus; Appendix 1. Gaius Gracchus' public speeches; Appendix 2. Pompius' public speeches; Appendix 3. Caesar's public speeches; Appendix 4. Piso's public speeches; Appendix 5. Cato's public speeches.

"Oratory and Political Career in the Late Roman Republic is a pioneering investigation into political life in the late Roman Republic. It explores the nature and extent to which Roman politicians embraced oratorical performances as part of their political career and how such performances influenced the careers of individual orators such as Gaius Gracchus, Pompeius Magnus, and Julius Caesar. Through six case studies, this book presents a complex and multifaceted picture of how Roman politicians employed oratory to articulate their personal and political agendas, to present themselves to a public obsessed with individual achievement, and ultimately to promote their individual careers. By dealing specifically with orators other than Cicero, this study offers much-needed alternatives to our understanding of public oratory in Rome. Moreover, the assessment of the impact of public speeches on the development of political careers provides new perspectives on the hotly debated nature of republican political culture"-- Provided by publisher.

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