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A history of the Roman equestrian order / Caillan Davenport.

By: Davenport, Caillan, 1981-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2019Description: xxv, 717 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781107032538 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Equestrian order (Rome) | Social classes -- Rome | Elite (Social sciences) -- Rome | Rome -- Social life and customs
Contents:
Introduction: charting the history of the equestrian order -- Riding for Rome -- Cicero's equestrian order -- Questions of status -- Pathways to the principate -- An imperial order -- Cursus and vita (I): officers -- Cursus and vita (II): administrators -- Ceremonies and consensus -- Spectators and performers -- Religion and the Res Publica -- Governors and generals -- The last Equites Romani -- Conclusion: the more things change....
Summary: "This book is an institutional and social history of the equestrian order (ordo equester) in the Roman world. It charts the history of the equestrians (equites) in their various guises from the eighth century BC to the fifth century AD. We begin with the mounted aristocracy of the Regal period and the cavalry of the early Republic, as the Romans regarded as these warriors as the ancestors of the later equestrian order. The order itself only emerged as a constituent status group within the Roman state (res publica), distinct from both the senate and the plebs, in the late second century BC. Membership of the equestrian order in the Republican period included tax-collectors, businessmen, jurors, and military officers. The equites Romani were distinguished by their own status symbols, such as gold rings and the tunic with a narrow stripe, ceremonies with religious and political meaning, and privileges such as front-row seats of the theatre. In the age of the emperors, the ranks of the equites included governors, financial administrators and other officials, as Augustus and his successors gave them an important role in the management of the res publica alongside senators"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: BSR new acquisitions 2019
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Notes Date due
Printed Books British School at Rome
272.3.D.6 (Browse shelf) 1 Available presented by Caillan Davenport

Includes bibliographical references (p. 631-686) and index.

Introduction: charting the history of the equestrian order -- Riding for Rome -- Cicero's equestrian order -- Questions of status -- Pathways to the principate -- An imperial order -- Cursus and vita (I): officers -- Cursus and vita (II): administrators -- Ceremonies and consensus -- Spectators and performers -- Religion and the Res Publica -- Governors and generals -- The last Equites Romani -- Conclusion: the more things change....

"This book is an institutional and social history of the equestrian order (ordo equester) in the Roman world. It charts the history of the equestrians (equites) in their various guises from the eighth century BC to the fifth century AD. We begin with the mounted aristocracy of the Regal period and the cavalry of the early Republic, as the Romans regarded as these warriors as the ancestors of the later equestrian order. The order itself only emerged as a constituent status group within the Roman state (res publica), distinct from both the senate and the plebs, in the late second century BC. Membership of the equestrian order in the Republican period included tax-collectors, businessmen, jurors, and military officers. The equites Romani were distinguished by their own status symbols, such as gold rings and the tunic with a narrow stripe, ceremonies with religious and political meaning, and privileges such as front-row seats of the theatre. In the age of the emperors, the ranks of the equites included governors, financial administrators and other officials, as Augustus and his successors gave them an important role in the management of the res publica alongside senators"-- Provided by publisher.

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